does anyone actually work on cars

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Re: does anyone actually work on cars

Postby nimby » Mon Aug 24, 2009 8:56 pm

my dream car

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"Why do we have asteroids in the hemisphere and hemmorroids in the a$$ ? "
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Re: does anyone actually work on cars

Postby carguy60 » Mon Aug 24, 2009 9:20 pm

nimby wrote:my dream car

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Oh, a 914! My brother has one of them. He bought it new in '71. It has about 45k miles on it.
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Re: does anyone actually work on cars

Postby FRE » Mon Aug 24, 2009 10:45 pm

From 1971 to 1974, I owned a Porsche 914. It was the most unreliable car I ever owned!! To compound the problem, the 2 Minneapolis dealers were very uncooperative. Even when the car could not be driven, one had to make an appointment more than a week in advance to have it serviced. Here are SOME of the problems I experienced:

The right front torsion bar broke and a new bar alone cost about $92 at a time when a Chrysler Corp. torsion bar cost about $20, and there was nothing special about the 914 torsion bar. Obviously the bar should not have broken.

The casings for the heater heat exchangers rusted out in less than 3 years, after which driving through a minor puddle would cause the windshield to steam up. It would have cost SEVERAL HUNDRED DOLLARS to fix the problem, and the new ones would also have rusted out quickly.

Under certain weather conditions, which were common in Minneapolis, moisture would condense in the distributor cap, making it impossible to start the car; I had to have it towed several times. There was no fix for the problem.

The accelerator response was not smooth. For example, if while in neutral you tried to speed up the engine gradually, it would suddenly jump from about 1500 rpm to about 2500 rpm, making it impossible to drive smoothly at parking lot speeds.

The hand brake worked on only one wheel. Because there was no way to adjust the 2 brake cables independently and there was no equalizer bar, the problem was next to impossible to fix, and the dealer denied that there was a problem.

A pin in the shift linkage broke, permitting the shift lever to swivel around. After that, I had to wear a leather glove on my right hand to keep the lever from swiveling. It took a few months to get a new pin.

The oil cooler gasket suddenly developed a very serious oil leak. The dealer claimed that in addition to the gasket leak, all the pushrod tubes were leaking and they charged several hundred dollars (in 1973) to fix the problem.

The clutch cable broke twice before I found out how to prevent the problem; the dealer never told me how to prevent it. In the rust belt, one normally thoroughly washes the car when road salt is no longer used in spring. In pressure washing under the car, grease is washed out from the crude sleeve bearing for the clutch cable pulley. Unless it is promptly re-greased, the bearing will freeze, causing the clutch cable to break.

Several times the starter failed to work when the engine was hot. The dealer was never able to find the problem.

The accelerator design was such that if one had a bit of snow on one's boots, it would get into the accelerator bearing and cause the accelerator to stick. That could be exciting!

Under normal driving conditions, the Porsche 914 handled beautifully. The steering was very responsive and had good feel to it. The car was also reasonably stable in cross-winds. HOWEVER, under certain conditions, the handling was treacherous. If, on imperfect pavement (wet, icy, or snowy pavement) the rear end started to slide, recovery could be totally impossible. In the four years I had the car, I spun out 3 times, and that is the only car on which I have ever spun out. If you pushed it just slightly too hard at certain speeds on wet pavement, it would alternate from having the front end slide to having the rear end slide. It was very difficult to control.

Based on my four years of experience with my 1971 Porsche 914, which I bought new, I most definitely would not recommend one!! It was a disaster. It was by far the worst car I ever owned. In fact, even this many years later, I would be very cautious about buying an Audi, Volkswagen, or Porsche; all are made by the same company.

At one time, door locks on Porsches, Audis, and Volkswagens all had the same defect, making it very easy to steal the cars. Even though it was a well-known defect, the manufacturer kept making locks with the same defect for several years. Possibly the attitude of the company has since changed, but I wouldn't count on it. The culture and attitudes of a company often persist for many years after those who established the culture and attitudes are long dead.
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Re: does anyone actually work on cars

Postby nimby » Tue Aug 25, 2009 12:48 pm

:cry: Another dream shattered.
"Why do we have asteroids in the hemisphere and hemmorroids in the a$$ ? "
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