Cell phone privacy

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Cell phone privacy

Postby Phoenix6570 » Mon Jan 18, 2010 11:50 am

I saw this video last night and it disturbed me. This is something everyone should watch and be aware of. The damage that can be done using this technology has unlimited possibilities.

It basically shows how our cell phones can be used to destroy any privacy we think we have. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pu5eddW24pM
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Re: Cell phone privacy

Postby backpacker » Mon Jan 18, 2010 4:30 pm

That's scary. Does someone have to physically get hold of your phone to install the software?
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Re: Cell phone privacy

Postby furface » Mon Jan 18, 2010 8:26 pm

Scott: If ya don't have a smart phone or one with some sort of transfer capability, then yes they've got to physically insert the malicious code. If ya got a smart phone (with or without Bluetooth) with an OS and connectivity they can get in just like he would to your computer(s). Trojans and other malware for phones do exist, but are rare right now in the wild. As more folks begin to acquire and use smart phones with more connectivity the potential for hacking them will increase, followed quickly by the reality.

Many mainstream anti-virus firms have software available now and more should come on line in the near future. You should secure your cells just as you should be securing your computers. Always practice safe hex.
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Re: Cell phone privacy

Postby JCDallon » Wed Aug 11, 2010 8:03 am

I saw this video last night and it disturbed me. This is something everyone should watch and be aware of. The damage that can be done using this technology has unlimited possibilities.

It basically shows how our cell phones can be used to destroy any privacy we think we have.


Geez..scary. A while ago was getting calls in the middle of the night and my cell phone company said there was no technology to block a number. I think the cell phone cameras and videos are a huge invasion of privacy as well.
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Re: Cell phone privacy

Postby butch » Wed Aug 11, 2010 2:03 pm

Butch is always on top of these kinds of things. You should never leave your phone unattended... it's a bit of a chore to install the spyware. Nor should you reply to unsolicited calls offering you a prize for entering a code or even pressing "accept".

Blackberry phones provide a slightly higher level of security than other kinds of phones but don't expect anything you put out there to be completely private.

I always assume that Google and Microsoft are spying on everything I do. There is some evidence that the CIA helps fund Google. You must assume that anything you say or post online is available to the government... EVERYTHING.

I always assume that every time my computer tells me that updates are ready for my computer... which is often, that my computer is reporting my activity back to microsoft. It would be insane not to assume otherwise.

Regarding cell phone cameras etc. As a photographer I have jealously guarded my right to photograph. It is extremely essential to maintain this right in order to protect our individual rights. Just think how many people in power have been brought down to justice for no other reason than they have been caught in their sins by someone with a cell phone camera. There is still an issue going on in British Columbia, where I live, over the RCMP killing a Polish man at the airport by taser... 5 hits on an innocent man. Nothing would have come to light if it had not been caught on a cellphone camera.

If you are in public you have no right to privacy. Butch believes this is good public policy. And just what are you trying to hide? Hmmm?

What people may legally do with an image of you is already protected by law. You may not be used in advertising without your permission, however, you may appear in a documentary film if you are in a public place where other people are also shown. You are protected from having your image being used in a distorted manner. For instance, you might have a case if you were caught on film walking past a porno shop and the image was used as part of a magazine or news article. It would be a civil case but you would have some rights in certain situations. More often than not, raising a stink about such issues would likely cause more harm than ignoring it. Old news is old news.

I was recently on local television protesting my right to photograph at a public pool. If I had more money I would have sued the City of Vancouver for violation of my rights under the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Just remember, if you are in a public place, you have no right to privacy.

In our modern age, privacy rights exist but are limited in public. That does not mean we should not be vigilant about what rights we DO have. Our rights are being eroded at an incredible speed and we are reaching a stage where we will soon have no rights at all. The USA is an extremely repressive country in spite of the fact that most think they have all kinds of freedoms. Europeans and Canadians have far more rights than the folks in the USA. More people are in prison in the USA, per capita, than any other country in the world except China. Ever think about that? Hmmm?
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Re: Cell phone privacy

Postby Earl Butz » Wed Aug 11, 2010 5:29 pm

My brother refuses to join Facebook because of privacy. I think he's paranoid.

I guess people in general are paranoid about posting on the internet....nobody posts on this site anymore.... :(
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Re: Cell phone privacy

Postby butch » Wed Aug 11, 2010 10:15 pm

Earl Butz wrote:My brother refuses to join Facebook because of privacy. I think he's paranoid.

I guess people in general are paranoid about posting on the internet....nobody posts on this site anymore.... :(


It's too bad your brother doesn't realize that he can set some pretty stringent privacy controls on FaceBook if he wanted to. My FaceBook page is open to anyone bored enough to check it out. http://FaceBook.com/ButchButchboard :lol: :lol:

The problem with bulletin boards has been a combination of factors, methinks. The rapid advance of social networking has allowed groups of friends to text and interact with each other... people they actually know, while bulletin boards are open to spammers, flamers and weirdos who have no real vested interest in the "community".

I notice that there are actually lots of people who visit this site... they just don't post anything. I guess that makes this place a source of information for the closeted... which is not a bad thing, but it makes this site less interesting to the "community" of people who have supported it.

I'm a recluse by nature so I don't text anyone and I don't like long lists of strangers on my FaceBook page so I don't accept friend requests there even though people ask me to be friends... I just don't know them. I allow anyone who will put up with me to be a YouTube friend and I have quite a few strangers who are listed as friends on my various channels.

But it does seem to be true that many are paranoid about posting on a gay related site... just in case the wrong person stumbles by or finds something in a search.
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Re: Cell phone privacy

Postby backpacker » Fri Aug 13, 2010 12:58 pm

Is a locker room considered public? :twisted: :D . I don't think I could take my cell phone out in a locker room I would be afraid everyone would think I was taking pictures. Not that I would do that. :lol:
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Re: Cell phone privacy

Postby butch » Fri Aug 13, 2010 1:54 pm

backpacker wrote:Is a locker room considered public? :twisted: :D . I don't think I could take my cell phone out in a locker room I would be afraid everyone would think I was taking pictures. Not that I would do that. :lol:


In law, a locker room IS NOT a public place.

A public place is any place that is not private property. It is why you may not, legally, take photos in a shopping mall, for instance. A shopping mall is NOT a public place. It is private property. Technically speaking, you may NOT take photographs in an amusement park either. It is private property. So... you see it can be tricky knowing your rights. If you took a photo in an amusement park and had your camera confiscated, you would have to prove IN COURT that the amusement park had waived their rights by consistently allowing photographs over an extended period of time.

It's like at some malls where their property and public property seem to overlap. By law, the mall must cordon off THEIR part of the property once a year to establish their actual ownership of the land or they could lose their rights to that land. Most don't notice, but Toronto Eaton Centre does that once a year by putting up yellow tape around certain areas that are part of their property... they do it for a single day. Most don't notice because it just seems like some construction, or repair is happening.

If your neighbours walk across your property to take a short cut and do it all the time, in law you could lose your right to stop them if someone took you to court and proved that people had been doing it for an extended (several years) period of time. You could actually lose your right to that bit of property. I'm quite serious... ask a lawyer. Most people think when they buy some property they have total rights over it... but that is not so. What you buy is called, in law, a "bundle of rights". You don't actually own the land, you own a "bundle of rights". Ask a real estate salesperson... that's part of the course. You don't own the mineral rights, for instance, under your property. Nor do you own the airspace above it... unless it specifically, and in writing, shows that right on the title for the property.

City owned, or government owned land falls into a grey area. Technically it is public property, however, if the owner (the city or government) chooses to restrict activities, they must post clear signage to make clear what the rules are. eg. NO PARKING. They may also impose "bylaws" which they are entitled to do under a government charter... the charter that makes it a legal entity such as a town or city.

This information brought to you by a photographer who knows his rights. Always remember, you have very few rights. You may think you do, but the very few rights you actually have are defined in law... and you should vigorously defend your rights at all times or you may lose the few rights you actually have. I say again, you have very few rights. American citizens have fewer rights than Canadians who have a Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Thank you, thank you, thank you to Pierre Trudeau. The basic rights Americans have are the amendments to the Constitution and the Constitution itself... e.g. the right to bear arms and the famous Fifth Amendment. Canadians do not have the right to bear arms except under strict conditions.
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Re: Cell phone privacy

Postby Earl Butz » Fri Aug 13, 2010 6:20 pm

Ah high school locker rooms....the best thing about being gay.... :P
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Re: Cell phone privacy

Postby nimby » Sat Aug 21, 2010 10:42 pm

butch wrote:I was recently on local television protesting my right to photograph at a public pool. If I had more money I would have sued the City of Vancouver for violation of my rights under the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Just remember, if you are in a public place, you have no right to privacy.



Soprry dude, but i disagree. You sure as hell do have rights to privacy in public. If that weren't the case then video cameras, concealed or not, in public bathrooms, showers, and even up shirt videos would not be indictable, which all are.

Now if I caught someone filming my children at a public pool, in and out of the water, for private and personal use, that camera would be in pieces.

End of story.
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Re: Cell phone privacy

Postby butch » Sun Aug 22, 2010 3:51 am

nimby wrote:
butch wrote:I was recently on local television protesting my right to photograph at a public pool. If I had more money I would have sued the City of Vancouver for violation of my rights under the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Just remember, if you are in a public place, you have no right to privacy.



Soprry dude, but i disagree. You sure as hell do have rights to privacy in public. If that weren't the case then video cameras, concealed or not, in public bathrooms, showers, and even up shirt videos would not be indictable, which all are.

Now if I caught someone filming my children at a public pool, in and out of the water, for private and personal use, that camera would be in pieces.

End of story.


You're completely wrong... YOU HAVEN"T A CLUE what you're talking about. You are making HUGE assumptions in your opinion... i.e. what is public and what is private. I'm well aware what is what. As a commercial photographer I know about the right to photograph which you must protect. That is why CTV did the interview... these kinds of incidents could effect THEM... it affects their right to photograph. Were it not so, then you would not be able to see most all public newscasts, nor would anyone be allowed to use a camera at any public beach... in fact it would become illegal to even own a camera. News camera people would be in deep trouble and would not be able to photograph anything at all. YouTube would have to shut down because 75% of the videos would be illegal to show. The right to photograph is a basic and fundamental right you should always be trying to protect. Many communist countries do not have the right to photograph in public places.

In the case of the swimming pool, all the pool had to do was post a sign... then I would not have had the right to photograph. But there was no sign. And, remember, we're not talking about bathrooms or changing rooms. We're talking about a large (500 foot) outdoor pool... and the public beach was only a few feet away.

Bathrooms and changing rooms ARE NOT PUBLIC... the point is, an open air pool, an outdoor pool is a public place, just like a sidewalk. Anyone who wants to can photograph you on a sidewalk. They can't use the photograph for advertising, nor for profit but they can take zillions of photos of you and you have no right to stop them.

I say again, you have no right to privacy in public. What the laws do protect you about is THE USE of photographs. It is an entirely different matter.

And... I SAY IT AGAIN... you DO NOT HAVE A RIGHT TO PRIVACY IN PUBLIC. That is why security cameras are legal.
Trust me, I know every detail about one's right to privacy because I've been a photographer most of my life. And if anyone laid so much as a baby finger on me you may be very, very, very sure they would be dragged in front of a judge who would set them straight. I've been threatened quite a few times while making videos for YouTube and I've let some people know that I will have no hesitation in charging them with assault. The last idiot who touched me many years ago found out the hard way when he tried to take ME to court. The judge threw him out of the courtroom for bad behaviour and told me I should have been a lawyer.

Ironically many, if not most, large cities have bylaws about commercial photography on city streets. When I was working for some big name photographers in Toronto we often did shoots on the street but we did it "in a hurry" because the cost of the permit far exceeded the profit that would be made from making the photos... and we did them for all kinds of large companies. A permit was very expensive, often far more than the billing price for the work of taking the photo. It's quite common among still photographers to avoid applying for permits and cities seldom go after still photographers for doing that... they really intend the permits to be for motion picture work.

:shock: :shock: :shock: :shock: :shock:
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Re: Cell phone privacy

Postby butch » Tue Aug 24, 2010 2:08 pm

nimby wrote:
butch wrote:I was recently on local television protesting my right to photograph at a public pool. If I had more money I would have sued the City of Vancouver for violation of my rights under the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Just remember, if you are in a public place, you have no right to privacy.



Soprry dude, but i disagree. You sure as hell do have rights to privacy in public. If that weren't the case then video cameras, concealed or not, in public bathrooms, showers, and even up shirt videos would not be indictable, which all are.

Now if I caught someone filming my children at a public pool, in and out of the water, for private and personal use, that camera would be in pieces.

End of story.


You've really incensed me by your lack of understanding of what I said. You have made HUGE assumptions that have NOTHING to do with the incident.
People wonder why I'm so reclusive but it's the idiot brains out there who drive me into my shell.
And... if you think you have a right to privacy from cameras in public, then just what do you think of THIS video... hmmmm?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nZjIu1tC3l0

Should this lady be upset by a camera invading her "right to privacy"?
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Re: Cell phone privacy

Postby Rico » Tue Aug 24, 2010 5:10 pm

butch wrote:You've really incensed me by your lack of understanding of what I said. You have made HUGE assumptions that have NOTHING to do with the incident.
People wonder why I'm so reclusive but it's the idiot brains out there who drive me into my shell....
And... if you think you have a right to privacy from cameras in public, then just what do you think of THIS video... hmmmm?


In terms of the law, you’re right and Nimby is wrong. Case closed. Congratulations. Go crack open a bottle champagne.

But on this subject you can’t ignore the ethical question involved, because that’s really at the heart of the public debate. From an ethical perspective, you’re both right. It then boils down to balancing “right versus right” and then to carefully put priorities on the two things that are both right.

If you were to stop and look at it that way, you might be able to gain a better perspective and a greater understanding of the issues, instead of lowering yourself to the everybody-else-is-an-idiot argument, which is insulting and gets you nowhere.
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Re: Cell phone privacy

Postby nimby » Tue Aug 24, 2010 6:04 pm

Butch, I dare you to go to your local public school, sit outside the fence and videotape children on a regular basis. I DARE YOU!!! Many people have and many people have been busted for public mischief. For what ever reasons, it is inappropriate. Filming children without their parent's consent is very frowned upon, never mind legal. That is a fact too.

So, please try it and prove me wrong. I'll gladly suck it up. Till then...
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Re: Cell phone privacy

Postby Cajun » Thu Aug 26, 2010 1:48 pm

Ah jeez - I knew I should have quoted that wonderfully prosaic post, before it went "poof" in the night..............
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Re: Cell phone privacy

Postby Jagesper » Mon Jul 04, 2011 10:41 am

In the situation that we have it is we who are responsible. We store all our private data in our smartphones, tablets. Even though we know that e-systems can be jailbroken. And later we complain that smb breaks into our privacy.
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Re: Cell phone privacy

Postby CalebMcanelly » Thu Aug 01, 2013 10:25 pm

What do you think that is really important for you? To most people they think that independence, privacy and safety is really of great importance to them and they also want to ensure them and so not want them to steal or risk by others that have somehow bad opinions on them. And how can they achieve this goal? Then the GPS jammer can be the best and first choice.
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Re: Cell phone privacy

Postby butch0715 » Tue Oct 08, 2013 10:45 pm

That video is unavailable. Any chance there is another link?
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