2010 Census

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2010 Census

Postby olywaguy » Tue Dec 21, 2010 3:32 pm

Well, the results of the 2010 Census came out today and it looks like Republican leaning states will be gaining more seats while some Democratic leaning states lost some. Washington State, however, gained a seat going from 9 to 10 districts in the state. Texas will gain 4 seats in the House going from 32 to 36 seats. Remember that these changes affect the number of votes in the Electoral College. Votes in the EC are based on the number of representatives in the House and the Senate.

Now, the big job of reapportionment will begin early next year. The legislatures will battle out the new boundaries and we will see how it all turns out. From what I've heard, Washington's 3rd congressional district (where I live, traditionally a Democratic district but now in the hands of the Republicans as of this past November) will be the area that might get split in order to make room for the new 10th district. I wonder how Texas is going to make room for its new 4 districts.

The population of the U.S. as of April 1, 2010 is now: 308,745,538

The population of the U.S. on April 1, 2000 was: 281,421,906

That's a 9.7% population increase for the country.

Take a look at the new population for each state and the percent change since the 2000 Census (actually, the information they provide goes as far back as 1910). How did your state fare?

BTW, Commerce Secretary Gary Locke was a former two term governor of Washington State before he joined the Obama Administration.



U.S. Census Bureau Announces 2010 Census Population Counts -- Apportionment Counts Delivered to President

The U.S. Census Bureau announced today that the 2010 Census showed the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2010, was 308,745,538.

The resident population represented an increase of 9.7 percent over the 2000 U.S. resident population of 281,421,906. Commerce Secretary Gary Locke, Acting Commerce Deputy Secretary Rebecca Blank and Census Bureau Director Robert Groves unveiled the official counts at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C.

"A big thanks to the American public for its overwhelming response to the 2010 Census," U.S. Commerce Secretary Gary Locke said. "The result was a successful count that came in on time and well under budget, with a final 2010 Census savings of $1.87 billion."

Rebecca Blank, now Acting Deputy Secretary of Commerce who has overseen the 2010 Census as Under Secretary for Economic Affairs, echoed Locke. "The 2010 Census was a massive undertaking, and in reporting these first results, we renew our commitment to our great American democracy peacefully, fairly and openly for the 23rd time in our nation's history."

The U.S. resident population represents the total number of people in the 50 states and the District of Columbia.

The most populous state was California (37,253,956); the least populous, Wyoming (563,626). The state that gained the most numerically since the 2000 Census was Texas (up 4,293,741 to 25,145,561) and the state that gained the most as a percentage of its 2000 Census count was Nevada (up 35.1% to 2,700,551).

Regionally, the South and the West picked up the bulk of the population increase, 14,318,924 and 8,747,621, respectively. But the Northeast and the Midwest also grew: 1,722,862 and 2,534,225.

Additionally, Puerto Rico's resident population was 3,725,789, a 2.2 percent decrease over the number counted a decade earlier.

Just before today's announcement, Locke delivered the apportionment counts to President Obama, 10 days before the statutory deadline of Dec. 31. The apportionment totals were calculated by a congressionally defined formula, in accordance with Title 2 of the U.S. Code, to divide among the states the 435 seats in the U.S. House of Representatives. The apportionment population consists of the resident population of the 50 states, plus the overseas military and federal civilian employees and their dependents living with them who could be allocated to a state. Each member of the House represents, on average, about 710,767 people. The populations of the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico are excluded from the apportionment population, as they do not have voting seats in Congress.

"The decennial count has been the basis for our representative form of government since 1790," Groves said. "At that time, each member of the House represented about 34,000 residents. Since then, the House has more than quadrupled in size, with each member now representing about 21 times as many constituents."

President Obama will transmit the apportionment counts to the 112th Congress during the first week of its first regular session in January. The reapportioned Congress will be the 113th, which convenes in January 2013.

Beginning in February and wrapping up by March 31, 2011, the Census Bureau will release demographic data to the states on a rolling basis so state governments can start the redistricting process.

Article I, Section 2 of the U.S. Constitution calls for a census of the nation's population every 10 years to apportion the House seats among the states. The 2010 Census is the 23rd census in our nation's history.


Carlos

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Re: 2010 Census

Postby Rico » Tue Dec 21, 2010 5:53 pm

I wonder how Texas is going to make room for its new 4 districts.


Simple. There will be more Congressional districts shaped like this actual district in North Carolina. Dems do the same thing when they can. It's such a rigged system. Isn't democracy wonderful?

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Re: 2010 Census

Postby olywaguy » Wed Dec 22, 2010 2:45 am

Washington State has an independent redistricting commission and has very specific rules on how to conduct its mission.

Our current nine Congressional districts which will grow to ten in the redistricting to come.


How are the commissioners appointed and who may serve?

Each House and Senate caucus leader appoints one voting member to the commission in January 2011. The four commission members, two Democrats and two Republicans, then appoint the nonvoting commission chairperson.

A commissioner may be any registered state voter who is not a current registered lobbyist or former lobbyist within one year before appointment. A commissioner cannot be a current elected official, or an elected state, district, or county party official, or have held such a position for two years prior to the appointment.

Commissioners may not campaign for elective office or actively participate in or contribute to a state or federal candidate running for office. A commission member must refrain from holding or campaigning for a state legislative office or for Congress for two years after the effective date of the plan.

How does the Commission adopt a redistricting plan? Can the plan be changed by the Legislature or vetoed by the Governor?

A redistricting plan must be approved by at least three of the four voting Commission members. This plan becomes final unless it is amended by the Legislature within 30 days after the beginning of the next regular or special session.

A legislative amendment, however, can affect no more than 2 percent of a legislative district’s population and must be approved by two-thirds of the members of both the House and Senate. The Governor may not veto the redistricting plan. There is no final vote of approval on the redistricting plan, and it takes effect after the 30-day period elapses. If the commission fails to meet the submission deadline, the state Supreme Court must prepare a plan by April 30, 2012.



Carlos

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