Prediction: Vote breakdown on hate crimes (vs. gays) bill

Enter at your own risk. There's bound to be some heated discussions in here about the elephant and the donkey.

Moderators: selective_soldier, drtom, edu999, devilnuts

Prediction: Vote breakdown on hate crimes (vs. gays) bill

Postby UnRepublicanstraightactor » Thu Nov 27, 2008 5:09 pm

Last time, people were saying "Bush would veto". Hopefully, people don't need to be convinced that Obama won't veto this...

Now, my prediction. First, the House --

First, out of the 212 Dems who voted for the bill that included transgender people as well as gays (Frizzurd, take note if you're still out there) last time (May 3rd, 2007), of those who ran for reelection and were successfully reelected, 200 remain --

Abercrombie
Ackerman
Allen
Altmire
Andrews
Arcuri
Baca
Baird
Baldwin
Barrow
Bean
Becerra
Berkley
Berman
Bishop (GA)
Bishop (NY)
Blumenauer
Boswell
Boucher
Boyd (FL)
Brady (PA)
Braley (IA)
Brown, Corrine
Butterfield
Capps
Capuano
Cardoza
Carnahan
Castor
Chandler
Clarke
Clay
Cleaver
Clyburn
Cohen
Conyers
Cooper
Costa
Costello
Courtney
Crowley
Cuellar
Cummings
Davis (AL)
Davis (CA)
Davis (IL)
DeFazio
DeGette
Delahunt
DeLauro
Dicks
Dingell
Doggett
Doyle
Edwards
Ellison
Emanuel
Eshoo
Etheridge
Farr
Filner
Frank (MA)
Giffords
Gillibrand
Gonzalez
Green, Al
Green, Gene
Grijalva
Gutierrez
Hall (NY)
Hare
Harman
Hastings (FL)
Herseth Sandlin
Higgins
Hill
Hinchey
Hinojosa
Hirono
Hodes
Holden
Holt
Honda
Hoyer
Inslee
Israel
Jackson (IL)
Jackson-Lee (TX)
Johnson (GA)
Kagen
Kanjorski
Kaptur
Kennedy
Kildee
Kilpatrick
Kind
Klein (FL)
Kucinich
Langevin
Larsen (WA)
Larson (CT)
Lee
Levin
Lewis (GA)
Lipinski
Loebsack
Lofgren, Zoe
Lowey
Lynch
Maloney (NY)
Markey
Marshall
Matheson
Matsui
McCarthy (NY)
McCollum (MN)
McDermott
McGovern
McNerney
Meek (FL)
Meeks (NY)
Michaud
Miller (NC)
Miller, George
Mitchell
Mollohan
Moore (KS)
Moore (WI)
Moran (VA)
Murphy (CT)
Murphy, Patrick
Murtha
Nadler
Napolitano
Neal (MA)
Oberstar
Obey
Olver
Pallone
Pascrell
Pastor
Payne
Pelosi
Perlmutter
Pomeroy
Price (NC)
Rahall
Rangel
Reyes
Rodriguez
Rothman
Roybal-Allard
Ruppersberger
Rush
Ryan (OH)
Salazar
Sánchez, Linda T.
Sanchez, Loretta
Sarbanes
Schakowsky
Schiff
Schwartz
Scott (GA)
Scott (VA)
Serrano
Sestak
Shea-Porter
Sherman
Sires
Skelton
Slaughter
Smith (WA)
Snyder
Solis
Space
Spratt
Stark
Stupak
Sutton
Tauscher
Thompson (CA)
Thompson (MS)
Tierney
Towns
Udall (CO)
Udall (NM)
Van Hollen
Velázquez
Visclosky
Walz (MN)
Wasserman Schultz
Waters
Watson
Watt
Waxman
Weiner
Welch (VT)
Wexler
Wilson (OH)
Woolsey
Wu
Yarmuth


Two Democrats who voted 'Yea' opted out of seeking reelection in safe Democratic seats; their replacements, included in parentheses, are expected to vote for the bill -- Darlene Hooley (Kurt Schrader) and Michael McNulty (Paul Tonko). Another, Marty Meehan, sought to go to what he considered greener pastures; he was replaced in the House with Niki Tsongas. One Democrat, Albert Wynn, was defeated for reelection in a primary by Donna Edwards. Three other Democrats in super safe districts that supported this legislation last time it came up for a vote have since passed on, and their replacements are expected to follow their lead and support it as well. Julia Carson was replaced in the House by her grandson Andre, Tom Lantos was replaced by Jackie Speier, and OH's Stephanie Tubbs-Jones' seat is now held by Marcia Fudge. Then there's Udall #1 and Udall #2, both of which successfully ran for Senate seats in their respective states and were replaced by fellow Democrats - Mark Udall (CO) by openly gay Jared Polis, and Tom Udall (NM) by Ben Ray Luján, both of which are absolutely expected to support the bill. That brings the number of Democrats expected to vote for the legislation next time it comes up for a vote to 209 so far.

Nancy Boyda (KS), Tim Mahoney (FL), and William Jefferson (LA) were the three House Dems that voted for it and ran for reelection, but lost. Nick Lampson of Texas didn't have a recorded vote either way on the bill, and wasn't reelected anyway. The Republicans that took the seats formerly held by these three Democrats are definitely not expected to vote for hate crimes legislation in the next Congress.

Meanwhile, the following (14) Dems voted against a bill that included transgender people as protected under hate crimes legislation:

Marion Berry (1st Arkansas)
Dan Boren (2nd Oklahoma)
Chris Carney (10th Pennsylvania)
Bud Cramer (5th Alabama)
Lincoln Davis (4th Tennessee)
Joe Donnelly (2nd Indiana)
Brad Ellsworth (8th Indiana)
Bart Gordon (6th Tennessee)
Mike McIntyre (7th North Carolina)
Charlie Melancon (3rd Louisiana)
Collin Peterson (7th Minnesota)
Mike Ross (4th Arkansas)
Heath Shuler (11th North Carolina)
Gene Taylor (4th Mississippi)

Only one of these (Carney) is expected to change his vote to a 'yea' next time around. Cramer, who didn't seek reelection to his seat, was replaced by fellow Democrat Parker Griffith, who just might vote for the legislation even though Cramer consistently voted against it. That brings the expected total of supportive Dems to 211, while the total of those expected to vote against it is now 12.

The following representative did not vote, and would *also* be expected to vote against it were he present:

John Tanner (8th Tennessee)

The following 4 also did not vote, but would be expected to vote for it if present, bringing the total of supportive Dems to 215.

Engel
Fattah
Eddie Bernice Johnson
Ortiz

Then, there will be the incoming Dems. First off, it's just about a given that if a new Dem defeated a Republican that voted for it, the Dem that occupies the seat will vote for it as well.

John Adler
Kathy Dahlkemper
Jim Himes
Frank Kratovil
Dan Maffei
Eric Massa
Dina Titus
Mary Jo Kilroy

Another very interesting case to note will be that of Democrat Betsy Markey, who succeeded the notoriously anti-gay Marilyn Musgrave in the House. She is expected to vote for the hate crimes bill, as is Michael McMahon, who succeeds Vito Fossella, who voted against a hate crimes bill that would protect LGBT citizens even though his own sister is a lesbian.

Another very interesting case to note will be that of Democrat Betsy Markey, who succeeded the notoriously anti-gay Marilyn Musgrave in the House. She is expected to vote for the hate crimes bill, as is Michael McMahon, who succeeds Vito Fossella, who voted against a hate crimes bill that would protect LGBT citizens even though his own sister is a lesbian.

Other reliable Democrats replacing Republicans that voted against this would be Larry Kissell, who replaced Robin Hayes, Suzanne Kosmas, who defeated Tom Feeney, and Alan Grayson, who replaces Ric Keller, Gary Peters, who defeated Joe Knollenberg, Mark Schauer, who defeated Tim Walberg, Martin Heinrich, who succeeded Heather Wilson, Harry Teague, who succeeded Steve Pearce, Ann Kirkpatrick, who succeeded Rick Renzi, Steve Driehaus, who defeated Steve Chabot, John Boccieri, who succeeded Ralph Regula, Glenn Nye, who defeated Thelma Drake, Tom Perirello, who defeated Virgil Goode, Gerry Connolly, who replaced Tom Davis, and Debbie Halvorson, who replaced Jerry Weller. This brings the number of supportive Democrats up to 239.

There are other Democrats, however, who were just elected in very conservative districts that may not be able to afford to vote for the legislation. These include:

Walt Minnick (ID-01)
Bobby Bright (AL-02)

A third, Travis Childers of Mississippi was elected in a special election earlier this year, would also be likely to vote "No" on this legislation. This brings the total number of Democrats that probably must vote against it to 16.

Lastly, Bill Foster is a Democrat that was elected in a special election {earlier this year} replacing the erstwhile Speaker of the House, Dennis Hastert, who was not present to cast a recorded vote last time. He would be expected to vote for the legislation, bringing the grand total of supportive Democrats to 240.

Next up, the Republicans that voted for the bill last time around. Of the 25 who did, only 14 both opted to run and actually managed to survive. These are:

Biggert
Bono
Castle
Dent
Diaz-Balart, L.
Diaz-Balart, M.
Frelinghuysen
Gerlach
Kirk
LoBiondo
Platts
Reichert
Ros-Lehtinen
Walden (OR)

Mike Ferguson of NJ did not seek reelection, and was replaced by another moderate Republican, Leonard Lance, who is expected to vote for the hate crimes legislation, bringing the total number of Republicans who will vote for it up to 15.

Phil English (PA), Randy Kuhl (NY), Jon Porter of Nevada, and Chris Shays of CT failed to win reelection. Wayne Gilchrest of Maryland, Jim Saxton of NJ, and James Walsh (NY) did not seek reelection. All seven were replaced by Democrats that are widely expected to vote for this legislation in the next Congress.

Ray LaHood of Illinois was replaced by Aaron Schock, who is not expected to vote for the legislation. Shock's name can be added to that of 162 other Republicans who either voted "no" (or voted "present" or were actually absent but are expected to vote "no" next time around) in 2007 and survived to the 111th Congress; that number also includes Republicans who replaced Republicans who voted "no" when their replacements are expected to do the same.



DEMOCRATS Aye (240) + Republicans Aye (15)
Democrats Nay (16) + Republicans Nay (163)

TOTAL AYES = 255
TOTAL NAYS = 179
Last edited by UnRepublicanstraightactor on Thu Dec 18, 2008 6:15 pm, edited 9 times in total.
GOProud's board president Christopher Barron answers the question why he's a gay Republican: "I prefer my government smaller -- say the size it would have to be to fit comfortably in Terri Schiavo's hospital room."
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Next up, Senate

Postby UnRepublicanstraightactor » Thu Nov 27, 2008 10:42 pm

All 51 Democratic Senators (for purposes of brevity I'm including Lieberman, as undeserving of the distinction as he is) voted yes on the bill and would have been eligible to serve in the next Congress had they chosen such. At least one has moved from from the Senate to cabinet positions, and though his replacements has been named, he has yet to be sworn in. For now, we'll keep the Senator from Colorado as a placeholder vote and perhaps come back and edit that bit later.

Akaka (D-HI)
Baucus (D-MT)
Bayh (D-IN)
Bingaman (D-NM)
Boxer (D-CA)
Brown (D-OH)
Burris (D-IL)
Byrd (D-WV)
Cantwell (D-WA)
Cardin (D-MD)
Carper (D-DE)
Casey (D-PA)
Conrad (D-ND)
Dodd (D-CT)
Dorgan (D-ND)
Durbin (D-IL)
Feingold (D-WI)
Feinstein (D-CA)
Gillibrand (D-NY)
Harkin (D-IA)
Inouye (D-HI)
Johnson (D-SD)
Kaufman (D-DE)
Kennedy (D-MA)
Kerry (D-MA)
Klobuchar (D-MN)
Kohl (D-WI)
Landrieu (D-LA)
Lautenberg (D-NJ)
Leahy (D-VT)
Levin (D-MI)
Lieberman (ID-CT)
Lincoln (D-AR)
McCaskill (D-MO)
Menendez (D-NJ)
Mikulski (D-MD)
Murray (D-WA)
Nelson (D-FL)
Nelson (D-NE)
Pryor (D-AR)
Reed (D-RI)
Reid (D-NV)
Rockefeller (D-WV)
Salazar (D-CO)
Sanders (I-VT)
Schumer (D-NY)
Stabenow (D-MI)
Tester (D-MT)
Webb (D-VA)
Whitehouse (D-RI)
Wyden (D-OR)


In addition, we have the confirmed freshman Democratic Senators --
52) Mark Warner (VA)
53) Tom Udall (NM)
54) Mark Udall (CO)
55) Jeanne Shaheen (NH)
56) Mark Begich (AK)
57) Jeff Merkley (OR)
58 ) Kay Hagan (NC)

Also --
59) Al Franken, a Democrat from MN, is expected to occupy his seat come the vote on this bill.

Now for the Republicans that voted 'Yea' on cloture last time --

60) Collins (R-ME)
61) Gregg (R-NH)
62) Lugar (R-IN)
63) Snowe (R-ME)
64) Specter (R-PA)
65) Voinovich (R-OH)

Two other Republican Senators that voted 'Yea' have since been replaced by Democrats. They are:

Smith (R-OR)
Warner (R-VA)


And the 'Nay' votes from last time that will be making an appearance in the next Congress:

Alexander (R-TN)
Barrasso (R-WY)
Bennett (R-UT)
Bond (R-MO)
Brownback (R-KS)
Bunning (R-KY)
Burr (R-NC)
Chambliss (R-GA)
Coburn (R-OK)
Cochran (R-MS)
Corker (R-TN)
Cornyn (R-TX)
Crapo (R-ID)
DeMint (R-SC)
Ensign (R-NV)
Enzi (R-WY)
Graham (R-SC)
Grassley (R-IA)
Hatch (R-UT)
Hutchison (R-TX)
Inhofe (R-OK)
Isakson (R-GA)
Kyl (R-AZ)
Martinez (R-FL)
McConnell (R-KY)
Murkowski (R-AK)
Roberts (R-KS)
Sessions (R-AL)
Shelby (R-AL)
Thune (R-SD)
Vitter (R-LA)


That's 31 'No' votes so far, all from Republicans.

Larry Craig (R-ID), Chuck Hagel (R-NE), and Trent Lott (R-MS) were replaced by Jim Risch, Mike Johanns, and Roger Wicker, respectively. All three are expected to follow their predecessors' "lead" and vote against the hate crimes legislation. That brings the 'Nays' up to 34.


Allard (R-CO), Dole (R-NC), Domenici (R-NM), Stevens (R-AK), Sununu (R-NH) have all been replaced by Democrats that will vote 'Yea'.


Also, some guy named McCain wasn't present for this vote last time. He would be expected to vote 'No', as he has every time this has come up for a vote, should he actually bother to show up and vote this time, that is. If he did, that would make 34 definite votes against.

So the final tally:

AYES: 65
NAYS: 35
GOProud's board president Christopher Barron answers the question why he's a gay Republican: "I prefer my government smaller -- say the size it would have to be to fit comfortably in Terri Schiavo's hospital room."
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Postby UnRepublicanstraightactor » Wed Apr 29, 2009 10:42 pm

It's nice to be able to say I called it pretty much exactly. Although my prediction wasn't reflected as such in the final vote count, that's only because, as it always is, it's impossible to predict whichever Reps won't be there in the chamber or simply won't be voting for whatever reason even if they are, on any given day

FINAL VOTE RESULTS FOR ROLL CALL 223

H R 1913 RECORDED VOTE 29-Apr-2009 4:55 PM
QUESTION: On Passage
BILL TITLE: Local Law Enforcement Hate Crimes Prevention Act

Ayes Noes NV
Democratic 231 17 8
Republican 18 158 2
Independent
TOTALS 249 175 10




---- AYES 249 ---

Abercrombie
Ackerman
Adler (NJ)
Altmire
Andrews
Arcuri
Baca
Baird
Baldwin
Barrow
Bean
Becerra
Berkley
Berman
Biggert
Bishop (GA)
Bishop (NY)
Blumenauer
Boccieri
Bono Mack
Boswell
Boucher
Boyd
Brady (PA)
Braley (IA)
Brown, Corrine
Cao
Capps
Capuano
Cardoza
Carnahan
Carson (IN)
Cassidy
Castle
Castor (FL)
Chandler
Clarke
Clay
Cleaver
Clyburn
Coffman (CO)
Cohen
Connolly (VA)
Conyers
Cooper
Costa
Costello
Courtney
Crowley
Cuellar
Cummings
Dahlkemper
Davis (CA)
Davis (IL)
DeFazio
DeGette
Delahunt
DeLauro
Dent
Diaz-Balart, L.
Diaz-Balart, M.
Dicks
Dingell
Doggett
Doyle
Driehaus
Edwards (MD)
Edwards (TX)
Ellison
Engel
Eshoo
Etheridge
Farr
Fattah
Filner
Foster
Frank (MA)
Frelinghuysen
Fudge
Gerlach
Giffords
Gonzalez
Grayson
Green, Al
Green, Gene
Grijalva
Gutierrez
Hall (NY)
Halvorson
Hare
Harman
Hastings (FL)
Heinrich
Herseth Sandlin
Higgins
Hill
Himes
Hinchey
Hinojosa
Hirono
Hodes
Holden
Holt
Honda
Hoyer
Inslee
Israel
Jackson (IL)
Jackson-Lee (TX)
Johnson (GA)
Johnson, E. B.
Kagen
Kanjorski
Kaptur
Kennedy
Kildee
Kilpatrick (MI)
Kilroy
Kind
Kirk
Kirkpatrick (AZ)
Kissell
Klein (FL)
Kosmas
Kratovil
Kucinich
Lance
Langevin
Larsen (WA)
Larson (CT)
Lee (CA)
Levin
Lewis (GA)
Lipinski
LoBiondo
Loebsack
Lofgren, Zoe
Lowey
Luján
Lynch
Maffei
Maloney
Markey (CO)
Markey (MA)
Marshall
Massa
Matheson
Matsui
McCarthy (NY)
McCollum
McDermott
McGovern
McMahon
McNerney
Meek (FL)
Meeks (NY)
Michaud
Miller (NC)
Minnick
Mitchell
Mollohan
Moore (KS)
Moore (WI)
Moran (VA)
Murphy (CT)
Murphy (NY)
Murphy, Patrick
Nadler (NY)
Napolitano
Neal (MA)
Nye
Oberstar
Obey
Olver
Ortiz
Pallone
Pascrell
Pastor (AZ)
Payne
Pelosi
Perlmutter
Peters
Pingree (ME)
Platts
Polis (CO)
Pomeroy
Price (NC)
Quigley
Rahall
Rangel
Reichert
Reyes
Richardson
Rodriguez
Ros-Lehtinen
Rothman (NJ)
Roybal-Allard
Rush
Ryan (OH)
Salazar
Sánchez, Linda T.
Sanchez, Loretta
Sarbanes
Schakowsky
Schauer
Schiff
Schrader
Schwartz
Scott (GA)
Scott (VA)
Serrano
Sestak
Shea-Porter
Sherman
Sires
Skelton
Slaughter
Smith (WA)
Snyder
Space
Speier
Spratt
Stupak
Sutton
Tauscher
Thompson (CA)
Thompson (MS)
Tierney
Titus
Tonko
Towns
Tsongas
Van Hollen
Velázquez
Visclosky
Walden
Walz
Wasserman Schultz
Waters
Watson
Watt
Waxman
Weiner
Welch
Wexler
Wilson (OH)
Woolsey
Wu
Yarmuth



---- NOES 175 ---

Aderholt
Akin
Alexander
Austria
Bachmann
Bachus
Barrett (SC)
Bartlett
Barton (TX)
Bilbray
Bilirakis
Bishop (UT)
Blackburn
Blunt
Boehner
Bonner
Boozman
Boren
Boustany
Brady (TX)
Bright
Broun (GA)
Brown (SC)
Brown-Waite, Ginny
Buchanan
Burton (IN)
Buyer
Calvert
Camp
Campbell
Cantor
Capito
Carney
Carter
Chaffetz
Childers
Coble
Cole
Conaway
Crenshaw
Culberson
Davis (AL)
Davis (KY)
Davis (TN)
Deal (GA)
Donnelly (IN)
Dreier
Duncan
Ehlers
Ellsworth
Emerson
Fallin
Flake
Fleming
Forbes
Fortenberry
Foxx
Franks (AZ)
Gallegly
Garrett (NJ)
Gingrey (GA)
Gohmert
Goodlatte
Gordon (TN)
Graves
Griffith
Guthrie
Hall (TX)
Harper
Hastings (WA)
Heller
Hensarling
Herger
Hoekstra
Hunter
Inglis
Issa
Jenkins
Johnson (IL)
Johnson, Sam
Jones
Jordan (OH)
King (IA)
King (NY)
Kingston
Kline (MN)
Lamborn
Latham
LaTourette
Latta
Lee (NY)
Lewis (CA)
Linder
Lucas
Luetkemeyer
Lummis
Lungren, Daniel E.
Mack
Manzullo
Marchant
McCarthy (CA)
McCaul
McClintock
McCotter
McHenry
McHugh
McIntyre
McKeon
McMorris Rodgers
Melancon
Mica
Miller (FL)
Miller (MI)
Miller, Gary
Moran (KS)
Murphy, Tim
Myrick
Neugebauer
Nunes
Olson
Paul
Paulsen
Pence
Peterson
Petri
Pitts
Poe (TX)
Posey
Price (GA)
Putnam
Radanovich
Rehberg
Roe (TN)
Rogers (AL)
Rogers (KY)
Rogers (MI)
Rohrabacher
Rooney
Roskam
Ross
Royce
Ryan (WI)
Scalise
Schmidt
Schock
Sensenbrenner
Sessions
Shadegg
Shimkus
Shuler
Shuster
Simpson
Smith (NE)
Smith (NJ)
Smith (TX)
Souder
Stearns
Sullivan
Tanner
Taylor
Terry
Thompson (PA)
Thornberry
Tiahrt
Tiberi
Turner
Upton
Wamp
Westmoreland
Whitfield
Wilson (SC)
Wittman
Wolf
Young (AK)
Young (FL)




---- NOT VOTING 10 ---

Berry
Burgess
Butterfield
Granger
Miller, George
Murtha
Perriello
Ruppersberger
Stark
Teague
/\
|
Of the above, six (Butterfield, Miller, Murtha, Perriello, Ruppersberger, and Stark) would have voted "aye" and four (Berry, Burgess, Granger, and Teague) would have voted "No", making my vote totals PERFECTLY RIGHT.
Last edited by UnRepublicanstraightactor on Sun May 24, 2009 12:17 pm, edited 3 times in total.
GOProud's board president Christopher Barron answers the question why he's a gay Republican: "I prefer my government smaller -- say the size it would have to be to fit comfortably in Terri Schiavo's hospital room."
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Oregon urges passage of federal hate bill

Postby UnRepublicanstraightactor » Fri May 22, 2009 2:26 am

Oregon urges passage of federal hate bill

By 365gay Newscenter Staff
05.20.2009 3:45pm

(Salem, Oregon) The Oregon State House of Representatives has unanimously passed a resolution calling on the United States Congress to pass the Matthew Shepard Local Law Enforcement Hate Crimes Prevention Act.

The 59-0 vote also condemned the recent brutal beating of two gay men at a Seaside, Ore. beach. The two men, Samson Deal and Kevin Petterson, were on spring break March 22 when several men dressed in black approached them from behind and beat the pair into unconsciousness.

After an initial review of the case, Seaside Police Chief Bob Goss announced that his department would be treat the beatings as a hate crime because the victims indicated that the assailants had yelled anti-gay slurs during the attack.

The Shepard Act passed the House of Representatives last month and adds sexual orientation to the list of categories covered under federal hate crime law. It currently is before the Senate, but committee hearings have not been set.

Just hours before the House vote, President Obama urged Congress to pass the bill.

” I urge members on both sides of the aisle to act on this important civil rights issue by passing this legislation to protect all of our citizens from violent acts of intolerance – legislation that will enhance civil rights protections, while also protecting our freedom of speech and association,” the President said in a statement.

The legislation was named for Matthew Shepard, the 21-year-old college student who was murdered in an anti-gay hate crime in Wyoming in October 1998. It would provide local police and sheriff’s departments with federal resources to combat hate violence.

Gay rights groups have been fighting to have the legislation passed for over a decade.

Because there is no federal law mandating states and municipalities to report hate crimes, they are often underreported. However, the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s own statistics, based on voluntary reporting, show that since 1991 over 100,000 hate crime offenses have been reported to the FBI, with 7,624 reported in 2007, the FBI’s most recent reporting period.

Violent crimes based on sexual orientation constituted 16.6 percent of all hate crimes in 2007, with 1,265 reported for the year. In addition, while not captured in the federal statistics, transgender Americans too often live in fear of violence.
GOProud's board president Christopher Barron answers the question why he's a gay Republican: "I prefer my government smaller -- say the size it would have to be to fit comfortably in Terri Schiavo's hospital room."
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Re: Congress acts to extend hate crimes to cover gays

Postby UnRepublicanstraightactor » Tue Oct 13, 2009 12:06 am

Story

A couple of notes. Even though the article frames it as the passage of the hate crimes bill, this 281-146 vote was actually the final House vote on authorizing the Defense Department's budget (and related provisions). But the hate crimes bill (which actually passed earlier, as I broke down the vote for earlier on this thread) was one of the amendments in the overall package that was voted on on Oct 8th.

This means that although most, if not all of the 131 House GOPhers that voted against it, probably did so because of the hate crimes provision (since the last thing House Republicans want to be seen as is weak on defense), out of the 44 that voted for it that didn't also vote for the hate crimes amendment earlier, those dozen or so didn't necessarily vote for the hate crimes bill so much as Defense Budget Authorization Spending. Meanwhile, some of the 15 Democrats that voted against it were voting against the defense budget spending, NOT the hate crimes bill. These 15 included people like Dennis Kucinich and Jesse Jackson Jr., as well as Bob Filner (CA), Michael Michaud (ME), Pete Stark (CA), and Peter Welch (VT), all of whom already voted for the hate crimes bill earlier.

The article should have done a better job of explaining the nuances of this final vote, but that's what I'm here for, so. :)

(Washington) The House voted Thursday to make it a federal crime to assault people because of their sexual orientation, significantly expanding the hate crimes law enacted in the days after Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination in 1968.

With expected passage by the Senate, federal prosecutors will for the first time be able to intervene in cases of violence perpetrated against gays.

Civil rights groups and their Democratic allies have been trying for more than a decade to broaden the reach of hate crimes law. This time it appears they will succeed. The measure is attached to a must-pass $680 billion defense policy bill and President Barack Obama – unlike President George W. Bush – is a strong supporter. The House passed the defense bill 281-146, with 15 Democrats and 131 Republicans in opposition.

“It’s a very exciting day for us here in the Capitol,” said House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., saying hate crimes legislation was on her agenda when she first entered Congress 22 years ago.

She said it’s been 11 years since the gay Wyoming college student Matthew Shepard, whose name was attached to the legislation, was murdered.

The late Sen. Edward Kennedy, D-Mass., was a longtime advocate of the legislation.

Many Republicans, normally stalwart supporters of defense bills, voted against it because of the addition of what they referred to as “thought crimes” legislation.

“This is radical social policy that is being put on the defense authorization bill, on the backs of our soldiers, because they probably can’t pass it on its own,” House Republican leader John Boehner of Ohio said.

GOP opponents were not assuaged by late changes in the bill to strengthen protections for religious speech and association – critics argued that pastors expressing beliefs about homosexuality could be prosecuted if their sermons were connected to later acts of violence against gays.

Supporters countered that prosecutions could occur only when bodily injury is involved, and no minister or protester could be targeted for expressing opposition to homosexuality.

The bill also creates a new federal crime to penalize attacks against U.S. service members on account of their service.

Hate crimes legislation enacted after King’s assassination defined hate crimes as those carried out on the basis of race, color, religion or national origin. It also limits the scope of activities that would trigger federal involvement.

The proposed expansion would include crimes based on gender, sexual orientation, gender identity or disability. It eases restrictions on federally protected activities.

Some 45 states have hate crimes statutes, and the bill would not change the current situation where investigations and prosecutions are carried out by state and local officials.

But it would provide federal grants to help with the prosecuting of hate crimes and funds programs to combat hate crimes committed by juveniles.

The federal government can step in after the Justice Department certifies that a state is unwilling or unable to follow through on a purported hate crime.

While Republicans voted against the defense bill because of the hate crimes addition, openly gay Democrat Jared Polis of Colorado said he would vote for it despite his opposition to U.S. military presence in Iraq. The reason hate crimes are so odious, he said, “is that they are not just crimes against individuals, they are crimes against entire communities and create environments of fear in entire communities.”

Tom McClusky, vice president of the conservative Family Research Council’s legislative arm said the next step likely would be contesting the legislation in court. “The religious protections are pretty flimsy,” he said. He contended that Democrats were trying to move their “homosexual agenda” this year because it would prove unpopular with voters next year.

The FBI says there are some 8,000 hate crimes reported around the country in a year. More than half of those are motivated by racial bias. Next most frequent are crimes based on religious bias at around 18 percent and sexual orientation at 16 percent.
GOProud's board president Christopher Barron answers the question why he's a gay Republican: "I prefer my government smaller -- say the size it would have to be to fit comfortably in Terri Schiavo's hospital room."
UnRepublicanstraightactor
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Re: Prediction: Vote breakdown on hate crimes (vs. gays) bill

Postby UnRepublicanstraightactor » Wed Oct 28, 2009 10:06 pm

AAAAAAAANNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD we're done --

Senate vote (Note I called the number of "Nay" votes EXACTLY and the "Yea" votes were off by just one):

Grouped By Vote Position YEAs ---64
Akaka (D-HI)
Baucus (D-MT)
Bayh (D-IN)
Begich (D-AK)
Bennet (D-CO)
Bingaman (D-NM)
Boxer (D-CA)
Brown (D-OH)
Burris (D-IL)
Byrd (D-WV)
Cantwell (D-WA)
Cardin (D-MD)
Carper (D-DE)
Casey (D-PA)
Collins (R-ME)
Conrad (D-ND)
Dodd (D-CT)
Dorgan (D-ND)
Durbin (D-IL)
Feinstein (D-CA)
Franken (D-MN)
Gillibrand (D-NY)
Hagan (D-NC)
Harkin (D-IA)
Inouye (D-HI)
Johnson (D-SD)
Kaufman (D-DE)
Kerry (D-MA)
Kirk (D-MA)
Klobuchar (D-MN)
Kohl (D-WI)
Landrieu (D-LA)
Lautenberg (D-NJ)
Leahy (D-VT)
Levin (D-MI)
Lieberman (ID-CT)
Lincoln (D-AR)
Lugar (R-IN)
McCaskill (D-MO)
Menendez (D-NJ)
Merkley (D-OR)
Mikulski (D-MD)
Murkowski (R-AK)
Murray (D-WA)
Nelson (D-FL)
Nelson (D-NE)
Pryor (D-AR)
Reed (D-RI)
Reid (D-NV)
Rockefeller (D-WV)
Sanders (I-VT)
Schumer (D-NY)
Shaheen (D-NH)
Snowe (R-ME)
Specter (D-PA)
Stabenow (D-MI)
Tester (D-MT)
Udall (D-CO)
Udall (D-NM)
Voinovich (R-OH)
Warner (D-VA)
Webb (D-VA)
Whitehouse (D-RI)
Wyden (D-OR)

NAYs ---35
Alexander (R-TN)
Barrasso (R-WY)
Bennett (R-UT)
Bond (R-MO)
Brownback (R-KS)
Bunning (R-KY)
Burr (R-NC)
Chambliss (R-GA)
Coburn (R-OK)
Cochran (R-MS)
Corker (R-TN)
Cornyn (R-TX)
Crapo (R-ID)
DeMint (R-SC)
Ensign (R-NV)
Enzi (R-WY)
Feingold (D-WI)
Graham (R-SC)
Grassley (R-IA)
Gregg (R-NH)
Hutchison (R-TX)
Inhofe (R-OK)
Isakson (R-GA)
Johanns (R-NE)
Kyl (R-AZ)
LeMieux (R-FL)
McCain (R-AZ)
McConnell (R-KY)
Risch (R-ID)
Roberts (R-KS)
Sessions (R-AL)
Shelby (R-AL)
Thune (R-SD)
Vitter (R-LA)
Wicker (R-MS)

Not Voting - 1
Hatch (R-UT)





And, at LONG LAST................

After 10-year dispute, expansion of hate crimes law to gays signed
Move may help Obama quell rising discontent from rights groups


When a gay Wyoming college student was slain in 1998, congressional Democrats pledged to broaden the definition of federal hate crimes by the end of that year to include attacks based on sexual orientation.

The effort instead turned into a decade-long proxy war between liberal groups that want to expand gay rights and conservative groups that do not. But Wednesday, President Obama signed the bill and then hosted a White House reception for gay activists and the parents of the slain student, 21-year-old Matthew Shepard.

"After more than a decade of opposition and delay, we've passed inclusive hate crimes legislation to help protect our citizens from violence based on what they look like, who they love, how they pray or who they are," Obama said after the signing.

During that period, the House and the Senate separately approved the hate crimes expansion numerous times. But congressional Republicans repeatedly used legislative tactics to block final passage, arguing that most crimes that would fall under the law could be prosecuted under other statutes, and conservative groups such as the Traditional Values Coalition said the legislation would turn "homosexual behaviors as well as cross-dressing, transvestism, and transsexualism into federally-protected 'minority' groups."

This year, with enlarged majorities in Congress, Democrats attached the hate crimes law to a $681 billion defense spending bill this month over GOP objections. House Minority Leader John A. Boehner (R-Ohio) said the approach put "radical social policy" on the "back of our soldiers."

The legislation extends provisions first passed in 1968 that make it a federal crime to target individuals because of their race, religion or national origin. Under the law, judges can impose harsher penalties on crimes that are motivated by such animus, and the Justice Department can help local police departments investigate alleged hate crimes.

According to the FBI, law enforcement agencies around the country reported 7,624 hate crime incidents in 2007, the most recent year for which data were available. More than half were categorized as racially motivated, and about 17 percent were based on sexual orientation.

For Obama, the signing could quell rising discontent among gay rights groups, which have complained that he has done little to advance their causes in first year in office.

In particular, many gay activists say, Obama has not made good on his pledge to repeal the "don't ask, don't tell" policy, which prevents gays from serving openly in the military, and the Defense of Marriage Act, which effectively allows states that do not permit gay marriage to not recognize the unions of gay couples married in states that do.

"I think that obviously there's a great deal of impatience and frustration within our community, not just related to the last 10 months, but the last 10 years," said Joe Solomonese, president of the District-based Human Rights Campaign, which has worked for years on the issue. "But the White House was an absolutely critical partner in getting this legislation to the president's desk, and I have no doubt the White House will continue to be a partner in this fight."

Shepard's mother, Judy, said in a statement that she and her husband, Dennis, "are incredibly grateful to Congress and the president for taking this step forward on behalf of hate crime victims and their families, especially given the continuing attacks on people simply for living their lives openly and honestly."

Although the House of Representatives passed the law 249 to 175 in a mostly party-line vote in April, the Senate added the legislation to the defense bill instead of passing it separately. The move angered Republicans, most of whom voted against the defense bill because of the hate crimes of both provisions in Congress.

"The Republican machine, they don't have the megaphone of the Obama administration, but maybe if they could have more effectively got their message out," said Mathew D. Staver, president of the Liberty Counsel, a conservative legal group.

But Rick Scarborough, head of the Texas-based conservative group Vision America, which has long opposed the hate crimes legislation, said there may be little Republicans can do to stop further gay rights legislation.

"I think they [bills that would expand gay rights] are morally wrong, and I'll continue to do my best to enter the debate," he said. "But it's a new day. These were the promises of Barack Obama, and he's living up to them."
GOProud's board president Christopher Barron answers the question why he's a gay Republican: "I prefer my government smaller -- say the size it would have to be to fit comfortably in Terri Schiavo's hospital room."
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